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Located on the southern slope of a mountain overlooking the Willamette Valley’s gorgeous wine region (Newberg, Oregon), the Karuna House Karuna Passive house is a construction venture challenging the three most demanding green building standards: Passive House (PHIUS+), Minergie-P-ECO, and LEED for Homes Platinum. In a real world application the triple certification might be an [continue reading…]

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Juggling the inevitable growing housing needs against the need to respect the environment is a real challenge. A responsible architect, builder or a new home owner will ask themselves – how can we minimize or even eliminate our carbon footprint while continuing the march of progress? Is it even possible? Amanda and Chris Costanza say [continue reading…]

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The builders of the Cottle Zero Energy Home say their newly build luxury house was recognized as one of the highest-performance, greenest and most energy efficient homes in the entire California. It was certified LEED Platinum, Passive House, EPA Indoor Air Plus, Net Zero Energy, and was awarded a special commendation by the California Energy [continue reading…]

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Luxury resorts and spas are often the playground of the rich and famous but a New Zealand architect is changing the way we think about resorts and re-imagining their entire purpose through the creation of the completely self-sustaining resort. Hugh Tennent is the Chief Architect for the Aro Ha Wellness Retreat, a luxurious $30 million spa that [continue reading…]

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The future is starting early in San Francisco because of a little (but not so small) cottage that architect David Baker hand-constructed in order to illustrate that not only can you create a home that generates its own energy but one that produces a surplus of it. David’s cottage is 100% free of any help from an electricity [continue reading…]

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The way we look at it is that if the house has no energy bills, it might as well be called a house that pays your bills. This Net Zero home in New Jersey, uses as much energy as it makes. It has no utility bills and it is (almost) entirely self sufficient. Some criticized [continue reading…]

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